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SPEAKING FOR THOSE WHO CAN’T SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES

Throwaway Ponies Horse Rescue

Throwaway Ponies (TaPs) was founded by Karen Bander and her daughter, Mary, with the dream of providing a home to horses who were old, lame, and virtually unadoptable. They began their rescue mission in 2005. Very early into the process, they realized there was a need to rescue more horses, as well as donkeys, mules, and ponies, and now they care for an average of 60 equines a year, of all ages.

TaPs’ mission is to provide a safe haven for horses who have been abused and neglected, or ones who may have been euthanized. 

TaPs operates solely with a staff of volunteers; there are no paid staff members here. They are proud of the fact that 100% of all donations and grants are applied directly towards helping the horses and other equines on site. Every week, about 50 volunteers donate their time and talents.

During their first ten years in operation, more than 200 equines came through TaPs’ gates. Out of that 200, 138 were adopted into loving homes. In those first years, twenty-six horses were able to live out their lives at the sanctuary.

Horses, donkeys, mules, and ponies come to TaPs from various situations. Many times, people realize they are no longer able to care for their animals and have contacted TaPs where the animals are taken and given a safe space. Other times, animals are rescued from horrendous situations of neglect and abuse. These animals have grown to fear humans. With the love and care they receive at TaPs, the neglected, forgotten, and abused souls learn to trust and lose their fear of humans. This is due to the amazing volunteers who donate their time and love in restoring the health and living conditions of these amazing creatures.

As much as the focus is on providing a loving, healing, and safe home for the equines at TaPs, Karen and Mary believe that every time they help an animal in need, they help people, too. The volunteers at TaPs are gaining self-confidence in themselves as they care for other creatures. They discover their humanity as they learn horsemanship. They learn the value of helping themselves by helping an animal regain its spirit.

On its website, Megan, a teen volunteer, wrote about her experience in finding and working with TaPs. She discovered her love of horses at a very young age and was always moved by stories of animals who were unloved by the ones they relied on most. She’s been volunteering at TaPs for a couple of years, after school and on weekends, and helps out by feeding the animals and working with both horses and children who need care and attention. Megan said that, “volunteering at TaPs has not only taught me about working with horses as an equal, but has also made a difference in the way I see other people and life. When I see a horse who was once starving, fearful, and ready to die become a healthy and happy creature being hugged and fed treats by a child, I feel proud that I helped to turn its life around—and show that animal that not all humans mean pain and anger. I feel proud this horse now has the chance to start life anew, and possibly give that child the ability to grow, recover from whatever happened to them, too, and pass the love on—like a chain reaction.”

Throwaway Ponies Horse Rescue is located in Farmersville, TX, about 30 miles northeast of Dallas. For more information, visit Throwaway Ponies.

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Throwaway Ponies Horse Rescue

Throwaway Ponies (TaPs) was founded by Karen Bander and her daughter, Mary, with the dream of providing a home to horses who were old, lame, and virtually unadoptable. They began their rescue mission in 2005. Very early into the process, they realized there was a need to rescue more horses, as well as donkeys, mules, and ponies, and now they care for an average of 60 equines a year, of all ages.

TaPs’ mission is to provide a safe haven for horses who have been abused and neglected, or ones who may have been euthanized. 

TaPs operates solely with a staff of volunteers; there are no paid staff members here. They are proud of the fact that 100% of all donations and grants are applied directly towards helping the horses and other equines on site. Every week, about 50 volunteers donate their time and talents.

During their first ten years in operation, more than 200 equines came through TaPs’ gates. Out of that 200, 138 were adopted into loving homes. In those first years, twenty-six horses were able to live out their lives at the sanctuary.

Horses, donkeys, mules, and ponies come to TaPs from various situations. Many times, people realize they are no longer able to care for their animals and have contacted TaPs where the animals are taken and given a safe space. Other times, animals are rescued from horrendous situations of neglect and abuse. These animals have grown to fear humans. With the love and care they receive at TaPs, the neglected, forgotten, and abused souls learn to trust and lose their fear of humans. This is due to the amazing volunteers who donate their time and love in restoring the health and living conditions of these amazing creatures.

As much as the focus is on providing a loving, healing, and safe home for the equines at TaPs, Karen and Mary believe that every time they help an animal in need, they help people, too. The volunteers at TaPs are gaining self-confidence in themselves as they care for other creatures. They discover their humanity as they learn horsemanship. They learn the value of helping themselves by helping an animal regain its spirit.

On its website, Megan, a teen volunteer, wrote about her experience in finding and working with TaPs. She discovered her love of horses at a very young age and was always moved by stories of animals who were unloved by the ones they relied on most. She’s been volunteering at TaPs for a couple of years, after school and on weekends, and helps out by feeding the animals and working with both horses and children who need care and attention. Megan said that, “volunteering at TaPs has not only taught me about working with horses as an equal, but has also made a difference in the way I see other people and life. When I see a horse who was once starving, fearful, and ready to die become a healthy and happy creature being hugged and fed treats by a child, I feel proud that I helped to turn its life around—and show that animal that not all humans mean pain and anger. I feel proud this horse now has the chance to start life anew, and possibly give that child the ability to grow, recover from whatever happened to them, too, and pass the love on—like a chain reaction.”

Throwaway Ponies Horse Rescue is located in Farmersville, TX, about 30 miles northeast of Dallas. For more information, visit Throwaway Ponies.

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